The morning coffee embraces J.K. Rowling

J.K. Rowling may have frustratingly wrote the same children’s book over and over again, disguising them as “sequels”. But she also wrote this great column for the Times, on the upcoming UK election and being a single mother.

This is probably the best-ever approach to bad Internet spelling.

Not all vegetarian burgers are healthy. Instead, some are an excellent source of neurotoxins.

Like that? You may like this.

2 thoughts on “The morning coffee embraces J.K. Rowling

  1. @curgoth Big Meat? That is way more awesome than Big Pharma or … other things “Big” out there.

    In any case, the authors of the study are denying the Big Meat funding … any evidence out there?

    And even if it were funded by Big Meat, it does not mean that the findings are wrong or falsified.

    On the other hand, if you take a look at the report, it is hardly a scientific paper: http://www.cornucopia.org/soysurvey/OrganicSoyReport/behindthebean_color_final.pdf

    In fact, the paper says very little about there even being any hexane residue in the soy, and absolutely nothing about any ill effects, healthwise, from such residue. In fact, the main thrust of the hexane section can be seen in the paper itself:

    “The Cornucopia Institute is petitioning the FDA to examine the effects of hexane in foods.”

    I love linking to science news, but science news is mostly crap. This is based on a paper that is examining the soy industry and challenging the basis on which it is considered “organic”, “environmentally friendly”, and so on.

    In essence, it challenges the belief that soy products are the environmentally-friendly, “natural” and “organic” alternative that they are sold as.

    In that, the paper is decent. The hexane/neurotoxin thing is a headline grabber, but a misleading one. There is no reason to believe that soy products made with hexane are unsafe — the paper rightly points towards this as not being in sync with what many consumers think they are buying.

    It implies, of course, that they *may* be unsafe. But it doesn’t have a shred of evidence to support this.

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